Post-classical ambient minimalism for crepuscular airports

Suss Müsik is PŪR Fun

Suss Müsik returns from a brief hiatus to release the eighth and latest in a series of live studio improvisations. This one uses primitive electronics, vibes, fake strings, bass, Moog synth, drums, and looped guitar feedback to create a vaguely fusion effect. Somewhat recalls Morris Pert’s work with Brand X, if a bit updated with post-rock tendencies. Recorded live to 8-track in August 2018.

This makes eight releases in the Non series. We may consider compiling these into a proper “album” at some point, or using some of this material in other ways.

Misophonia

Misophonia album coverSuss Müsik is continuing to release “The Singles Project,” a series of thematic two-track recordings each based solely on a given concept or theme. All releases are issued and distributed under the self-formed Lůno banner.

The latest of the series is titled Misophonia, now available on Bandcamp and soon to be available on your favorite music streaming vehicles: Google Play, Amazon Music, YouTube, Apple Music, iTunes, Spotify etc. Suss Müsik further penetrates the world with our post-modern nonsense.

Misophonia consists of two tracks, each around eight to ten minutes in length, based on the compositional idea of cyclical phasing. The pieces consist of percussion (mostly vibraphone and marimba), slide guitar, little rocks dropped on strings, birds, and vocals. If you love the music of Steve Reich (comparable to his album The Four Sections), then it’s possible that you might like this. Full description below:

The door to the Suss Müsik studio leads to a wooden gate, behind which is a garden where birds of all types assemble. Occasionally we walk the path with a small box of birdseed and let the creatures fight it out. At one point, we counted as many as forty birds fluttering about the property.

In totally unrelated news, Suss Müsik has been reading about the pineal gland. This is the part of the vertebrate brain that splits the two haves of the thalamus joint and produces melatonin, the hormone that modulates circadian and seasonal sleep patterns. The pineal gland is also known as “the third eye,” a term of metaphysical significance to those who pursue a higher spiritual consciousness.

There is a theory that the pineal gland is the gateway through which we are able to communicate with non-human lifeforms. Suss Müsik wonders if the birds have a similar means of instinctual, non-verbal communication. Perhaps there are sounds we find repetitive or annoying (repetitive dripping water, chewing gum, the tapping of a pencil, etc.) that enable communication with extraterrestrial species beyond our audiophiliac astral plane. But that’s another topic for another time.

Misophonia I and Misophonia II were originally composed and submitted as part of the Disquiet Junto global collective of weekly music projects.

A Record Label Called Lůno

Lůno logoSuss Müsik is in the process of remastering and reissuing a back catalogue of releases under a new label called Lůno. The whole idea of a “record label” seems wonderfully anachronistic, given the way music is distributed and consumed in today’s world driven by small screens and short attention spans.

In any event, the short-term intention is to establish a consistent and commercially accessible library of Suss Müsik material. We needed some sort of vehicle to accomplish this, so we created Lůno as a way to build a properly viable distribution network.

In the longer term, it’s not impossible that Lůno may encompass additional avenues or collaborations. There is already a YouTube channel of meditative, “sound healing” experiences which will hopefully be expanded.

The first two Lůno releases Zygotes and Hiko are available in all the usual spots: Apple/iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Spotify, YouTube Music, and probably some other places. The next release will likely appear this coming week. All seven fans of Suss Müsik are undoubtedly teetering on the edges of their seats.

Hiko

Hiko album coverSuss Müsik is releasing a series of thematic two-track recordings based on a singular idea. We’re calling it “The Singles Project.” The first of the series is now available on Bandcamp. It’s called Hiko and the description is below.

The word “hiko” is one of several terms used by Eskimos to describe ice. According to the theory of linguistic relativity, a language’s structure is tightly bound to the culture in which it is spoken. Eskimo languages are polysynthetic, meaning that morphemes are invented organically through everyday usage: a suffix added here, a prefix deleted there.

Glaciers undergo a similar process of fissure and restoration. During winter, enormous sheets of polar ice laboriously drift towards the sea. These giants thaw in summer, breaking into chunks to be later reconstituted into the frozen bulk. Increasingly warmer global temperatures have created what scientists call “ice mélanges” where glacial ice becomes granular and slushy, slowing movement and inhibiting the regeneration process.

For these two works composed as a suite, Suss Müsik sought to represent varying textures of glacial ice using sound. The first movement of Hiko I explores the viscous, wintry state of glaciers traveling at the speed of molasses. The second movement of Hiko I represents the thawing and breaking of glacial ice during summer.

Hiko I is composed for cello, violin, Moog synthesizer, ice cubes, flute, organ and piano. The echoey ice-clink harmonics heard at the end of the piece are the result of the Moog effects processor filtering the sound of ice cubes being cracked.

For Hiko II, larger fragments are broken and diffused to depict the ice mélange as a state of purgatory. The smallest components are constantly in motion, yet there is no reconstructive outcome to conclude the piece.

Hiko II is composed for violin, viola, cello, vibraphone, vocals, mellotron, piano, tuba, trombone, Moog synthesizer and ice cubes. The sampled ice cubes were clipped and sequenced to resemble a percussion instrument played with mallets.

Music is a form of language, and the sound of ice hitting glass is inherently percussive. Both of these pieces use the live sound of ice cubes being dropped into a glass tumbler. (It’s surprisingly difficult to keep accurate time with melting ice — the cubes get slippery after a while).

Hiko I and Hiko II were originally composed and submitted as part of the Disquiet Junto global collective of weekly music projects.

Live Studio Improvisations

Suss Müsik is releasing a series of live improvisations, recorded straight to 8-track in the studio. This effort (working title Non) is in conjunction with an upcoming announcement regarding Suss Müsik’s distribution of material. We’re very excited about these developments.

Anyway, the first release of the series is titled Op-Ed and was performed on treated piano, guitar, electronics, organ and percussion. It got a little crazy after a while, but this excerpt of three and a half minutes was captured nicely.

Zygotes Release Now Available

Cover of Zygotes After a “soft launch” in which we received feedback from a few trusted advisors, Zygotes is now released. You can find it on BandCamp right now, and soon it will be available on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, Pandora and a few other places.

Many thanks to those who provided advance feedback and critiques: C. Koustourlis, W.W. Allen, D. Toub, A. Selby, M. Carvin in particular.

Update 01/05: Zygotes is now available on Bandcamp, iTunes, Spotify, Google Play and Amazon. You can also listen for free on YouTube.

A New New Album to Replace the Old New Album

Cover of Zygotes Suss Müsik is preparing a proper release entitled Zygotes. It will consist of six compositions for “fake orchestras” using strings, piano, woodwinds, percussion, sound collage, little electronic doodads and (in one instance) a Roland CR-78 rhythm machine. It could be our best effort or our worst, or perhaps somewhere in the middle. A preview track entitled Mersozhaun is available on SoundCloud, so you can judge for yourself. The cover is a picture of a newly-cracked egg with its yolk oozing all over the place.

Update: the track has been removed as we are getting closer to official release.

A Future in Commons

“I am driven by two main philosophies,” said the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. “Know more today about the world than I knew yesterday, and lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you.”

For the past year or so, Suss Müsik has participated in the weekly Disquiet Junto projects led by Marc Weidenbaum. For those unfamiliar, a junto is a gathering of like-minded colleagues for the purpose of sharing knowledge, friendship and conversation. The first Junto, known as the Leather Apron Club (now there’s a great name for a band), was launched by Benjamin Franklin in 1727 and lasted for 30 years.

Taking part in the Disquiet Junto has turned out to be a richly rewarding experience. We’ve made new friends and been exposed to a constellation of artistic influences from around the globe. Sadly, we were also made aware of the plight of Bassel Khartabil, a 3D modeling artist and software developer who was was detained by the Syrian government in 2012.

A Future in Commons coverSince his incarceration, human rights organizations have persistently campaigned for Khartabil’s release. His last known whereabouts was the Adra Prison in the suburbs of Damascus, Syria in October 2015. It was unknown whether Khartabil was alive or dead up until very recently, when in August 2017 his widow received confirmation that her husband had been executed.

In celebration of Khartabil’s life and work, English/Swedish musician and Junto participant Rupert Lally spearheaded the creation and release of a 31-track compilation album entitled A Future to Commons. All of the music is provided by participants of the Disquiet Junto.

Suss Müsik is honored to be a part of this moving tribute, yet we are frustrated at the senseless nature by which evil is permitted to transgress the boundaries of human existence. One might concede that from suffering can arise newly semantic forms of artistic expression, although we’d argue that a world with Bassel Khartabil alive and safe is better than one without.

The following is an excerpt from Marc Weidenbaum’s liner notes for the album:

During [Bassel Khartabil’s] incarceration, and during the extended period when his death was presumed but not yet confirmed, his story became a rallying point around the world. His plight inspired essays, and conference sessions, and political statements. And it inspired music … Facets of Bassel’s life provided several such prompts over the years. We created soundscapes to bring a new dimension to his CGI renderings. We sampled his voice and turned it into music. We created VR scores, and we tried to extrapolate sound from the poetic language of his correspondence. In the end, what we tried to do was spread word of his plight, to keep his story alive even after he was no longer.

A Future to Commons is available on Bandcamp, with all proceeds going toward the Creative Commons Bassel Khartabil Memorial Fund.

Decatenation, The Ongoing Saga

Suss Müsik is no longer perplexed as to why the upcoming release Decatenation is taking so long. What resulted was a simple acknowledgement that the quality and running order of the pieces simply weren’t up to scratch. Also, our participation in the weekly Disquiet Junto projects made for a very pleasant and fertile distraction these past few months.

In any event, a combination of new and newly-written material will lead to the distribution of this release. Two tracks from the original running order have been cut, while six others are undergoing transformation. Half the material are reworks of Junto contributions. In fact, one track is a rework of a rework of an edit of a rework. Now you know.

The one track that has persisted in its originally submitted form is Mudlairing, which is available for preview on YouTube and SoundCloud.

Weird Combinations

Lately, Suss Müsik has been exploring a number of odd combinations in our compositions. The latest transgression in our musical roadmap can only be described as “what would happen if Brian Eno collaborated with Black Sabbath while recording My Life in the Bush of Ghosts.” That should give you some idea of what this monstrosity sounds like. Another way to describe the piece is that it’s rough, sloppy, loud and mechanical. We really like it, of course.

The new piece obviously needs to go through a gestation period; however, this might be what Decatenation needs before its delayed release sees the light of day.